Tricyclic Drugs as an alternative cancer treatment

Using Tricyclic Drugs to disrupt cancer cells

Tricyclic drugs have been around some considerable time. Pherergan and Chlomipramine are just two.

But over the last couple of years certain cancer experts have asked whether their unique action might be used to correct the altered biochemistry of a cancer cell. Could they really be an alternative cancer treatment - and a cheap one at that?

When a normal healthy cell, becomes a cancer cell there are a number of changes. One major change concerns that of the mitochondria the cells power stations, which start to produce their power, not from carbohydrate and oxygen but from the anaerobic burning of glucose. These power stations contain DNA, they power down, become acidic, polluted and high in sodium.

Several experts have suggested that tricyclic drugs - most of which have been on the market for years and some of which are even out of patent - may be able to disrupt these rogue power stations. It seems one of those areas which should have potential logically, but getting it to work has not proved particularly rewarding.

In the first of these two articles Dr Robert Jones examines the theories and looks at the very common child cough remedy, Phenergan. 

In the second, Professor Geoff Pilkington looks at the use of Chlomipramine for brain tumour treatments. Since this article was written, we have covered research in Cancer Watch that Chlomipramine seems to help the brain tumour drug, Temozolomide, work better.

Our bottom line

As you will observe, we have removed the link to Phenergan. And, we are sorry to say, this whole area seems to be a triumph of theory over delivery. The theory seems strong, but the delivery has been poor in terms of results. I feel for Pilkington who is a good man and has devoted a lot of time and effort in trying to get this to work well. Certainly, with the ineffectiveness of current brain cancer treatments he is to be applauded for endeavour.

Tricyclic Drugs as an alternative cancer treatment
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