Cutting back on salt reduces cancer risk

Cutting back on salt reduces cancer risk
 

 

The World Cancer Research Fund has recently confirmed what several studies in Cancer Watch have previously reported. Namely that cutting common salt intake cuts colorectal cancer risk significantly. Previous studies have looked at people in Asia, particularly the Japanese who consume large quantities of salt in products such as soya sauce. 

 

 

 

 

 

In Chris Woollams book the Tree of Life and subsequently The Rainbow Diet, he has been warning about the dangers of common salt for nearly ten years. In Roman times salt was rare and people were sometimes even paid in salt the word sal for salt giving rise to salary. Animals in the wild find salt licks having gone without salt for three weeks or more. Chris is very anti the consumption of refined table salt; even 90 per cent of high street sea salt is refined. It is all just common sodium chloride, an excess of which can change the acidity in the stomach, blood and cells. And acid bodies are unhealthy bodies. An excess of sodium in the cell can even lower oxygen and power levels setting up the onset of cancer conditions.

 

 

 

 

 

Chris calculated that humans should consume no more than 1 gm a day. The UK Food Standards Agency recommends a whopping 6 gms per day, and the WCRF estimates the average daily consumption for a UK adult at 8.6 gms. Worst offenders are packaged and processed foods, Chinese meals, dried meats, sausages, bacon, and even a slice of bread or a bowl of refined breakfast cereal is likely to have a third of a gram of salt in it.

 

 

 

 

 

New research from the WCRF has concluded that if UK consumers cut their consumption from 8.6 back to 6 gms, stomach cancer rates would fall by 14 per cent. We dont think even that is enough!

 

 

 

 

 

Besides telling you not to eat common refined table and sea salt, CANCERactive has suggested people look at natural salts which contain, for example, calcium and magnesium compounds (Dead Sea Salt etc).

 

 

 

 

 

For an article on healthy salts CLICK HERE 

 

 

 

 

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